Manual for living II

Post your training journals here if you like. I'll make back-ups to avoid losing your data.

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Mickey O'neil
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Re: Manual for living II

Post by Mickey O'neil » Mon May 21, 2012 10:07 am

Congratulations, odin! Awesome work!

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Xian
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Re: Manual for living II

Post by Xian » Mon May 21, 2012 11:09 am

Congrats Odin. Though you could easily double your numbers if you spend some more time learning the ways of the Force.
There is a vast difference between treating effects and adjusting the causes.

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Bobby
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Re: Manual for living II

Post by Bobby » Mon May 21, 2012 12:08 pm

Nice work,especially after a holiday.Did you do it without those silly suits as well?
You`ll toughen up.Unless you have a serious medical condition commonly refered to as
"being a pussy".

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Beer Jew
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Re: Manual for living II

Post by Beer Jew » Mon May 21, 2012 2:46 pm

Great work Odin.

Nice bench. What was your bw?

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odin
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Re: Manual for living II

Post by odin » Mon May 21, 2012 7:50 pm

thanks chaps! I don't use any gear beyond a belt. BW should be around 85kg but I am carrying a few lbs of Italian wine around at the moment. Think I was 86 and a half kilos or something on the day. If I dieted properly I think I could get under the 83kg cat, but I've never been that bothered to be honest. I enjoyed the experience though, and hope to do another one in December and continue to add a few kilo's to my total.

Today:

21/05

1. yoga - 15 mins asana (posted above) followed by some diaphragm breathing and then Xian's pranayama sequence. Finished with some natural breath awareness type stuff. May do this last part in savasana in future.

2. foam roll

3. Fucker of a day at work which my body could have done without. Had a decent sized LPG cylinder go bang about 6 foot away from me. Blew out a wall but I flinched not. Just silently shat my pants. The hallmark of a true warrior. Then another few hours rolling hose up in some surprisingly hot weather.
Don't try too hard, don't not try too hard

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odin
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Re: Manual for living II

Post by odin » Thu May 24, 2012 10:06 am

22/05

1. asana, with a vyayam twist:
-sun salutations a&b x 3 each
-Flat footed squats (slow, sycnhed with breath) x 20
-Dands x 10
-Back bridges
-shoulder stand/plough
-headstand

2. xian's pranayama sequence (I sit with some diaphragmatic breathing beforehand to calm myself a bit, and then follow it with some basic breath awareness to finish)

3. foam roll and another busy day at work.


23/05/12

1. asana - standng postures from ashtanga primary series with normal, deep breathing (not ujayi)

2. pranayama sequence above

later in day

30 mins KB practice with our colleague who has just done the RKC instructor course. Picked up some good tips actually, was impressed....


24/05/12

1. asana - practice written about above

2. pranayama sequence


Notes/initial thoughts:
practically speaking, the current schedule takes too long; it's about an hour start to finish, where as the JM+breathing stuff I was doing could be done in 30 mins if it had to be, or extended when time permitted.
It gives off a sense of well-being and energy that few other practices do, and this is appealing. However, there doesn't seem to be the 'depth' of previous, simpler practices. I like relaxing into a nice meditative state, where as this seems a bit more like an internal workout, if that makes any sense at all...

No conclusions as yet.
Don't try too hard, don't not try too hard

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Mickey O'neil
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Re: Manual for living II

Post by Mickey O'neil » Thu May 24, 2012 10:08 am

So where to now regarding training?

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odin
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Re: Manual for living II

Post by odin » Thu May 24, 2012 12:11 pm

well, I want to do something a little different for the summer, but not too much, as I want to at least retain my strength for a possible comp in December. Think the plan is some general strength/conditioning stuff until sept and then back into a more PL orientated schedule. Still aching at the moment though, so this week will just be playing at stuff....
Don't try too hard, don't not try too hard

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Re: Manual for living II

Post by Abandoned by Wolves » Fri May 25, 2012 3:48 am

odin wrote:22/05

1. asana, with a vyayam twist:
-sun salutations a&b x 3 each
-Flat footed squats (slow, sycnhed with breath) x 20
-Dands x 10
-Back bridges
-shoulder stand/plough
-headstand

2. xian's pranayama sequence (I sit with some diaphragmatic breathing beforehand to calm myself a bit, and then follow it with some basic breath awareness to finish)

3. foam roll and another busy day at work.


23/05/12

1. asana - standng postures from ashtanga primary series with normal, deep breathing (not ujayi)

2. pranayama sequence above

later in day

30 mins KB practice with our colleague who has just done the RKC instructor course. Picked up some good tips actually, was impressed....


24/05/12

1. asana - practice written about above

2. pranayama sequence


Notes/initial thoughts:
practically speaking, the current schedule takes too long; it's about an hour start to finish, where as the JM+breathing stuff I was doing could be done in 30 mins if it had to be, or extended when time permitted.
It gives off a sense of well-being and energy that few other practices do, and this is appealing. However, there doesn't seem to be the 'depth' of previous, simpler practices. I like relaxing into a nice meditative state, where as this seems a bit more like an internal workout, if that makes any sense at all...

No conclusions as yet.
Steve Maxwell once said that the primary purpose of Ashtanga was to calm young men down by wearing them out. Might be part of it.

I think you are experiencing something I've also suspected: as great as hatha yoga can be, various schools of yoga like to load their practice up with all kinds of extra folderol to keep the "easily bored" (and the hobbyists and status seekers) occupied while the basic benefits of the practice take hold. Those benefits do happen, but maybe not for the reasons the shallow and the unsuspecting think. (Alan Watts would say that they are eating the meal, not the menu, but they don't really understand the recipe or the dish itself.)

Simpler lets you go deeper if you have the patience.
"I also think training like a Navy S.E.A.L. is stupid for the average person. I would say PT like an infantry unit, run, body weight stuff, hump a little, a little weights and enjoy life if you are not training for specifics." -tough old man

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odin
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Re: Manual for living II

Post by odin » Fri May 25, 2012 7:44 am

yes, I think I agree - thanks for expanding on that. What Alan Watts stuff do you recommend? I've not really read anything directly from him, just a couple of intro's here and there and a podcast leture.

For me I think it's abot a balance. I like the idea of simplicity, but sometimes simply sittng and attending to the breath in its natural state or just attending to the mind is a bit beyond my grasp without some prelminary stuff. I also like things which work on an immediately physical level. This is why Chesser's elongating breath method is so good for me - it requires enough effort to force concentration to occur and it creates a physically relaxed state, but it's really pretty simple too. The other thing about it is that I'm not reading up on stuff all the time to check I'm doing it right!
Don't try too hard, don't not try too hard

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odin
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Re: Manual for living II

Post by odin » Fri May 25, 2012 8:21 pm

ok, so some ideas for training over the summer. I basically want to get some more general strength & conditioning stuff in while keeping an eye on the PL comp in december. I'm thinking of keeping things pretty similar, but using some subtle differences in the exercise selection and upping the reps a bit, (6-10 or so)

Something like:

Day One:

Squat variant
Bench variant
assistance on feel

Day Two:

Deadlift or clean alternated
Incline press or military press
assistance on feel

Day Three:

Hardstyle! KB practice for conditioning

For the main lifts I think I'll just aim to get in and hit a few sets of 6-10 reps on each exercise. I normally add a set of chins in between each lift anyway so I'll keep that practice up. Assistance may be farners walks, sled work or medicine balls if the weather stays good.

any pointers from those with knowledges would be great...
Don't try too hard, don't not try too hard

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Re: Manual for living II

Post by Abandoned by Wolves » Sat May 26, 2012 2:22 am

odin wrote:yes, I think I agree - thanks for expanding on that. What Alan Watts stuff do you recommend? I've not really read anything directly from him, just a couple of intro's here and there and a podcast leture.

For me I think it's abot a balance. I like the idea of simplicity, but sometimes simply sittng and attending to the breath in its natural state or just attending to the mind is a bit beyond my grasp without some prelminary stuff. I also like things which work on an immediately physical level. This is why Chesser's elongating breath method is so good for me - it requires enough effort to force concentration to occur and it creates a physically relaxed state, but it's really pretty simple too. The other thing about it is that I'm not reading up on stuff all the time to check I'm doing it right!

Watts had several classics in his day: my favorite is probably "Psychotherapy East And West", followed by "The Wisdom Of Insecurity" and his memoir, "In My Own Way". The most mind blowing is probably "The Book: The Taboo Against Knowing Who You Are."

He's witty, playful, and erudite and seemed to have the ability to just "draw" things out of the air and put them down on paper. Don't know how well his work will "age" in another few decades, but to me he is right up there with Krishnamurti as a fellow who can take all your questions about life and living and turn them on their heads and make you see things in a new way.
"I also think training like a Navy S.E.A.L. is stupid for the average person. I would say PT like an infantry unit, run, body weight stuff, hump a little, a little weights and enjoy life if you are not training for specifics." -tough old man

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odin
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Re: Manual for living II

Post by odin » Thu May 31, 2012 11:51 am

I am with you re the krishnamurti thing. He's not always easy reading, (some audio stuff I have of his is better) but he's definitely worth persevering with. If I had a hierarchy of teachers he would be undoubtedly at the top. I've spotted an Alan Watts podcast actually, so I'll get some of his stuff from that. Thanks for the tips!

Anyway, training stuff; I've trained over the past week, but it was hardly worth recording. One of the problems with completing a goal or even just finishing off a successful training cycle is working out where to go next. I know I need time both physically and mentally to just meander for a bit, but it's quite a hard adjustment after being quite focused for the past couple of months. Think the answer is just to do my stuff, log it and forget about it. Too much thinking can convince you things needs changing when they are perfectly ok.

Past few days:

29/05

morning: Joing mobility and meditation


afternoon:

1. power clean - 60kg x 3, 70kg x 3x3
2. Front Squat - 70, 90, 100, 105kg x 6
3. KB Press - 16, 20, 24kg x 5/5 x 3 sets
4. KB swings - 32kg x 4 x 10


30/05

Morning: JM & meditation

Afternoon: 4 mile walk


31/05 - KB's

Morning: JM & meditation

Late Morning:

Warm up (all with 16kg):
1. sling shots x 10/10
2. Halo's x 10/10
3. Figure 8's x 10/10
4. Goblet Squats x 10/10
5. RDL x 10/10

warm up II:
1. 2h swing x 3 x 20
2. push ups x 3 x 10

Workout:

A1: C&FSQ - 32kg x 3 x (2,3,5 L+R)
A2: Bent press -32kg x 3 x (1,2,3 L+R)
B1: Clean - 16kg x 3 x 10/10
B2: Snatch - 16kg x 10.10
C: 2H Swings - 32kg x 7 x 10

All done Hardstyle!
Don't try too hard, don't not try too hard

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Re: Manual for living II

Post by odin » Thu Jun 07, 2012 12:03 pm

Not been logging for the past week or so, as my training seems pretty aimless at the moment. It's undoubtedly a result of having been quite focused in the first half of the year, and now having nothing on the horizon, but knowing that doesn't make it any less frustrating. Anyway, to keep me on the straight path while I spin my wheels a bit I thought I'd focus more on logging the 'soft' practices I do.

After a bit of experimenting over the past month, I'm going to switch to my walking meditation as my daily thing. It's summertime so it makes sense. When the mornings get too dark again I'll revert back to Chesser's method or something very similar. I want to avoid too much flip-flopping, but equally a slight change can do good things for your motivation, and seasonal rotation is like, totally tao. The walking method I use is pretty similar anyway, with a focus on a gradual elongation of the breath.

Other shit like yoga (hatha) will be more ad hoc.... Anyway, enough bullshit.


07/06

1. walking meditation followed by joint mobility routine

started with 4/4 and gradually worked up to an 8/8 breath. At this point it felt a little forced so I backed down again, and then moved to a 2/4 breath, (ie exhaling for twice the inhale). This was a pretty fast pace - not like I was power walking, but not meandering around either. Either of those extremes are a good way of making you look like an eccentric prick so I avoid them.


2. yoga - 45 mins:

Did the Iyengar week 1 routine from LOY, with shoulder stand and headstand at the end. After reading Bedlam's log I focused on really comfortable, natural breaths in each posture. I also stole his tip of only focusing on the inhale, and allowing the exhale to go as it pleases. Seemed to work nicely. Finished with a sitting posture for extra good karma, then corpse for a few mins. Made me feel good, which is the point of any training, be it lifting weights or training your breath.
Don't try too hard, don't not try too hard

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